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United We Stand

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150 Years Since The Gettysburg Address

Four Score And Seven years Ago

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

 Fun Facts About Our Presidents


1.     George Washington was the only president to be unanimously elected (1732-1799).   


2.     There is no period after the  “S” in Harry S Truman due to the fact the the "S" does not stand for anything.

 
3.    John Lloyd Wright invented Lincoln Logs and named them after Abraham Lincoln and the log cabin where he grew up.


4.   “Teddy Bears” were named when Theodore “Teddy” Roosevelt (1858-1919) refused to shoot a small bear cub one day. The incident was reported in the news, which inspired a toy manufacture to come out with these stuffed animals. 

5.    James Abram Garfield (1831-1881) is the first president to ever talk on the phone. He spoke to Alexander Graham Bell, who was 13 miles away. 

6.    James Garfield had a special ability.  He was able write Latin with one hand and Greek with the other hand simultaneously. 

7.    John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) would often skinny dip in the Potomac River. 

8.    Abraham Lincoln was the first president to ever be photographed at his inauguration. What is even more interesting is John Wilkes Booth(his future assassin) was standing above him on the balcony in the photo. 

9.    The doctor who treated the broken ankle of Lincoln assassin, John Wilkes Booth, received a presidential pardon from Ulysses S. Grant in 1869. His name was Samuel Mudd. 

10.   At his first inauguration, George Washington added the “so help me God” to the end of the oath of office
                                       









(1) Frank, Sid and Arden Davis Melick. 1977. The Presidents: Tidbits and Trivia.  New York, NY: Greenwich House.
(2)Smith, Carter. 2004. Presidents: Every Question Answered. Irvington, NY: Hylas Publishing.
(3) Stebben, Gregg and Jim Morris. 1998. White House Confidential: The Little Book of Weird Presidential History. Nashville, TN: Cumberland House Publishing.
(4)Boller, Paul F. Jr. 2007. Presidential Diversion: Presidents at Play from George Washington to George W. Bush. Orlando, FL: Harcourt Books.
(5)Stebben, Gregg and Jim Morris. 1998. White House Confidential: The Little Book of Weird Presidential History. Nashville, TN: Cumberland House Publishing.
(6)O’Brien, Cormac. 2004. Secret Lives of the U.S. Presidents: What Your Teachers Never Told You about the Men of the White House. Philadelphia, PA: Quirk Books.
(7)O’Brien, Cormac. 2004. Secret Lives of the U.S. Presidents: What Your Teachers Never Told You about the Men of the White House. Philadelphia, PA: Quirk Books.
(8)Stebben, Gregg and Jim Morris. 1998. White House Confidential: The Little Book of Weird Presidential History. Nashville, TN: Cumberland House Publishing.
(9)O’Brien, Cormac. 2004. Secret Lives of the U.S. Presidents: What Your Teachers Never Told You about the Men of the White House. Philadelphia, PA: Quirk Books.
(10)Frank, Sid and Arden Davis Melick. 1977. The Presidents: Tidbits and Trivia.  New York, NY: Greenwich House.

Tuesday, November 19, 2013


The date was, November 19, 1863.  The words were few and compiled in only ten sentences.  The scene was the Soldier’s National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania for the burial of Union soldiers just four and a half months after the Union armies defeated the Confederate armies at the Battle of Gettysburg.  There were no teleprompters.  The speech was written by the President himself; President Abraham Lincoln.  Edward Everett, politician and teacher from Massachusetts,  delivered a two-hour oration before President Lincoln spoke for just over 2 minutes.   It took only two minutes to deliver.  Yet, it is considered to be one of the most memorable, most meaningful speeches ever given.  He had been asked to give “a few appropriate remarks.”  He did indeed do so.



The Gettysburg Address

"Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.
Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.
But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth."